Posted in Literacy, Storytelling

Storytelling: Why telling stories to our child is important

Ah storytelling…even just the word to me is so magical, so inspiring, so anticipating. I love telling stories, perhaps because I also a mild obsession with children’s stories and as a (former) early elementary teacher, I’ve read countless stories to so many children. Though I only ever read them stories. It wasn’t until I had my own children that I truly came to know and witness the magic of storytelling and why every child should be told a story.

I want to share many different aspects of storytelling, such as why do we tell stories, how do I share a story, what should I tell about. I’ve talked with other parents and teachers about how they do storytelling and often the response is, “It’s hard to tell a story,” “My stories are all always the same,” or “I have absolutely no idea HOW to tell a story.” As much as we judge ourselves about our stories, our young children don’t seem to hold the same judgement, they just love listening. So for the sake of the children that I so passionately love, I want to share this magic and the beauty of storytelling. Please visit back often as I will share a little at a time. It is my hope that you will gain the same love of storytelling that I have and also to help you see that you and anyone can be an amazing storyteller!

So for today’s post I want to share WHY storytelling is so important.

  • Let’s first look back in time to when hunters would go off for the day and return back home with the hunt. A fire is made as the men, women, and children gather around to hear the tale of the hunt. An entrancing story is told (and often acted out) as children sit and listen, hardly even blinking. The stories hold wonderment and magic, bu they also hold facts. These stories pass on knowledge for the young boys who will become the next hunter. They learn how to hunt, what tools to use, where the best spot is, etc. Same is true for the women as they would tell stories of the days gatherings, harvesting plants and herbs. They pass on information about what plants to harvest and which to stay away from. So while these stories connect the people of a group at night under the stars, they also pass on information.
  • Stories help our children deal with big emotions and challenges. When stories are told that children can connect to, they can process and understand what is happening from a distance but yet they can connect it back to themselves. I once told a story to my children but my goal was to connect to my son who was experiencing some fear and anxiety about swim lessons. My story was about a pronghorn (we see those all the time driving out here) named Junip who was entering a race and his family and all pronghorns trekked to the Great Plains for the race. He was very nervous to compete and meet other pronghorns. So long story short, Junip faced his fears, ran like the wind, did his best, and met new friends.
  • Stories open up a whole world of imagination and creativity for children, and adults. Truthfully, deep down we all still have a child within. Well-told stories beg for the full circle of questions, and answers, and then more questions. Stories are wonderful for the brain. As a story is being told, the brain is constantly firing neurons and making synapses as it can’t help but make connections to what is being heard. And guess what…to the person who is telling a story, that brain is more active too!
  • Stories bring a focus or a center of attention to our children. One day, we had a long drive ahead of us and my kids were just in one of those moods where they were constantly arguing and bickering. I decided this was the perfect time for a story. Thirty minutes had gone by and no one interrupted, argued, etc. I would look back and I could tell their bodies were settled, relaxed, their eyes were looking out the window as if they were watching the story happen outside. After the story, their whole moods had changed. Also, telling stories before bedtime brings that relaxation to their bodies and minds so they will fall asleep better.

When children are told stories, wonderful things happen to the body, mind, and soul. However, stories aren’t being told as often as they should. We can change that. In my next post, I want to share with you the HOW of storytelling.

 

 

 

 

 

Author:

Hello, I am former elementary teacher, now homeschool mom of 2. My true passions are my family and teaching and I love being able to do both. I have also been a brain workout trainer and a nature school facilitator. We are a nature-loving family that enjoy learning by playing, creating, cooking, crafting, reading, building, and more.

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